Covered In Glory Day 7: Faithless, Associates, Blancmange, Youth Group & The Bangles

Richard:

Covered in Glory LogoMoving from yesterday’s 80s East German TV clip to one from Spanish TV in 2010, from the final Faithless album comes this inspired cover of ‘Feel Me Now’ by Blancmange. Makes you wish they had done more covers in hindsight. Roy and I saw them performing this at Brixton on the final tour and Harry Collier has quite the voice.

Playing it back I realise the lyric includes the line ‘Flying through a plate glass window’ which, as Roy will attest, is something I have actually done and would not recommend.

You can catch up on our choices on previous days here.

Roy:

Along with the Monkees TV show, my earliest memories of listening to music were the records my parents played in the house. Most passed me by, but Diana Ross & The Supremes pristine soul pop caught my childhood imagination. So much so that one of the records I took to Uni with me was my Dad’s Supremes compilation – the famous one with the microphones and lips front cover which got a bit awkward during the post-punk and Goth years! However as much as I love the Supremes I never got to grips with Diana Ross’ solo career at all; so when this inspired cover version of one of her better solo outings appeared, it was a ‘Love Hangover’ on first listen – particularly as its sung by one of the finest and purest pop voices of the 80’s. The single was released in 1982 reaching 21 in the charts.

 

Ian:

Also mining the 1980s, I had originally planned to present a personal favourite, Soft Cell’s cover of the Gloria Jones’ tune “Tainted Love”. The original is still worthy for its Supremes-like vocals while the cover reminds me, in a not unpleasant way, of a particularly complicated period for my love life while at university. However, Richard & Roy’s selections, with 1980s keyboards running through both, brought to mind Alphaville’s “Forever Young”. Written at the tail end of the Cold War, the lyrics are surprisingly pertinent today:

“Let’s dance in style, let’s dance for a while
Heaven can wait we’re only watching the skies
Hoping for the best, but expecting the worst
Are you gonna drop the bomb or not?

Some are like water, some are like the heat
Some are a melody and some are the beat
Sooner or later they all will be gone
Why don’t they stay young?

It’s so hard to get old without a cause
I don’t want to perish like a fading horse
Youth’s like diamonds in the sun,
And diamonds are forever.”

While covered by a couple of artists, including Laura Branigan, the version that resonates most with me is the one by Youth Group, an indie rock band from inner Sydney. They were asked by the producers of TV show “The O.C.” to cover the track for the program and had subsequent success with it in Australia, reaching #2 on the national charts and gold record status in 2006. I think the song’s success can be credited at least in part to the associated video. While the clip is just the tune played over scenes from a 1975 skate boarding competition held at the Sydney Coca Cola factory, the film captures the youth, the innocence & the sunny simplicity of the era perfectly.

 

Gerard:

Much appreciate the varied respective contributions so far . Apologies for the lateness of my small input .. truth be told that upon cold reflection, many of my considerations erred more on the side of quirkiness pure and simple. So after due reconsideration, I’ve decided to concentrate on just a few selections.
From 1987 and initially a track on the soundtrack of the film ‘Less Than Zero’, this cover version had already been played live by the band since the early 1980s. I’ve got a remix of this track on a CD of their single, “In Your Room”. It’s the first time I’d become aware of the ‘other side’ to their music. It’s given a rockier edge than the Simon & Garfunkel original and a new lease of life as a result. It proved very popular when released as a single (also in 1987) , reaching No. 2 in the US and No. 11 in the UK.
I could have chosen The Bangles’ version of Prince’s Manic Monday but this cover of Hazy Shade of Winter is more left-field

Andy:

Two Blancmange’s in one day – can you possibly cope with this indulgence?!
I’ve gone for their take on a late ABBA song, which reached a pitiful number 32 in the singles chart compared to the cover version, which managed to scale the heights of number 22 in 1984. So, my conclusion is statistically-speaking the cover version is better than the original. Discuss…

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10 thoughts on “Covered In Glory Day 7: Faithless, Associates, Blancmange, Youth Group & The Bangles

  1. Forgotten about this ….and yes plate glass windows, definitely not recommended. Also like their cover of ‘Reasons to Be Cheerful’ which has a Dury sample in it so maybe not strictly speaking a cover.

  2. Along with the Monkees TV show, my earliest memories of listening to music were the records my parents played in the house. Most passed me by, but Diana Ross & The Supremes pristine soul pop caught my childhood imagination. So much so that one of the records I took to Uni with me was my Dad’s Supremes compilation – the famous one with the microphones and lips front cover which got a bit awkward during the post-punk and Goth years! However as much as I love the Supremes I never got to grips with Diana Ross’ solo career at all; so when this inspired cover version of one of her better solo outings appeared, it was a ‘Love Hangover’ on first listen – particularly as its sung by one of the finest and purest pop voices of the 80’s. The single was released in 1982 reaching 21 in the charts.

  3. For those of you who enjoy disappearing down musical rabbit holes, there is virtually an entire sub-genre of covers of The Supremes’ ‘You Keep Me Hanging On’ – most famously and appallingly Phil Collins but also; Kim Wilde, 60’s stoner rockers Vanilla Fudge, reggae legend Ken Boothe, Rod Stewart, Lisa Stansfield, Colourbox, Madness and many others including a Country & Western version.

  4. Also mining the 1980s, I had originally planned to present a personal favourite, Soft Cell’s cover of the Gloria Jones’ tune “Tainted Love”. The original is still worthy for its Supremes-like vocals while the cover reminds me, in a not unpleasant way, of a particularly complicated period for my love life while at university. However, Richard & Roy’s selections, with 1980s keyboards running through both, brought to mind Alphaville’s “Forever Young”. Written at the tail end of the Cold War, the lyrics are surprisingly pertinent today:

    “Let’s dance in style, let’s dance for a while
    Heaven can wait we’re only watching the skies
    Hoping for the best, but expecting the worst
    Are you gonna drop the bomb or not?

    Some are like water, some are like the heat
    Some are a melody and some are the beat
    Sooner or later they all will be gone
    Why don’t they stay young?

    It’s so hard to get old without a cause
    I don’t want to perish like a fading horse
    Youth’s like diamonds in the sun,
    And diamonds are forever.”

    While covered by a couple of artists, including Laura Branigan, the version that resonates most with me is the one by Youth Group, an indie rock band from inner Sydney. They were asked by the producers of TV show “The O.C.” to cover the track for the program and had subsequent success with it in Australia, reaching #2 on the national charts and gold record status in 2006. I think the song’s success can be credited at least in part to the associated video. While the clip is just the tune played over scenes from a 1975 skate boarding competition held at the Sydney Coca Cola factory, the film captures the youth, the innocence & the sunny simplicity of the era perfectly.

    1. Enjoyed listening to that, partly as I have never heard the Alphaville original so was just listening to it as a piece of music as opposed to comparing it to the source..

  5. Much appreciate the varied respective contributions so far . Apologies for the lateness of my small input .. truth be told that upon cold reflection, many of my considerations erred more on the side of quirkiness pure and simple. So after due reconsideration, I’ve decided to concentrate on just a few selections.
    From 1987 and initially a track on the soundtrack of the film ‘Less Than Zero’, this cover version had already been played live by the band since the early 1980s. I’ve got a remix of this track on a CD of their single, “In Your Room”. It’s the first time I’d become aware of the ‘other side’ to their music. It’s given a rockier edge than the Simon & Garfunkel original and a new lease of life as a result. It proved very popular when released as a single (also in 1987) , reaching No. 2 in the US and No. 11 in the UK.
    I could have chosen The Bangles’ version of Prince’s Manic Monday but this cover of Hazy Shade of Winter is more left-field

  6. Two Blancmange’s in one day – can you possibly cope with this indulgence?!
    I’ve gone for their take on a late ABBA song, which reached a pitiful number 32 in the singles chart compared to the cover version, which managed to scale the heights of number 22 in 1984. So, my conclusion is statistically-speaking the cover version is better than the original. Discuss…

    https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=the+day+before+you+came+blancmange&oq=the+day+before+you+came+&aqs=chrome.5.69i57j0l5.10664j1j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

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