Top tracks of 2017 #19 – Four Tet, Fatima Yamaha, Grandaddy & Confidence Man

My next artist, Kieran Hebden – aka Four Tet – was born just across the river from me in Putney. I heard this a few times on Autumn weekend mornings whilst lying in bed listening to the Mary Anne Hobbs show and contemplating getting up. This unofficial video works really well as the track accompanies a gorgeous archive film of 1950s San Francisco.

It’s a glorious groove, but I somehow doubt when people come to look back on 2017 they will say ‘yes, that is exactly what 2017 sounded like’. Sadly something far more confrontational would be required, as will be reflected higher up my list.

In the meantime here is Four Tet with ‘Two Thousand and Seventeen’:

Roy:

My number 19 is by Fatima Yamaha. An avant-garde female Egyptian artist ? A Japanese Garage Rock band ? No, a Dutch bloke called Bas. This is the sublime Araya

Andy:

I may be wrong but this may appear in other people’s lists, but they’ll know, and we’ll find out in the coming days. I’ve no idea what they’ve been up to in the intervening time because the only album I have of theirs is “The Sophtware Slump” from 2000, which contains the wonderfully-titled 9 minute epic “He’s Simple, He’s Dumb, He’s The Pilot”, along with “The Crystal Lake”, which some of you will certainly be familar with. So, this was a single from their 2017 offering “Last Place”, which thankfully is something during my nascent running career I’ve so far managed to avoid! Number 19…

Ian:

Not usually my style, I fully expect I will never buy an album by electropop collective Confidence Man. But their single “Better Sit Down” boy is one of these annoying ear-worms which my subsconscious tries to block but which I end up tagging repeatedly on Shazam over a couple of months. The band, comprised of various members of Aussie indie acts like The Belligerents, Moses Gunn Collective and the Jungle Giants, are known only by their stage names such as Reggie Goodchild, Clarence McGuffie, Janet Planet and Sugar Bones. This, along with the band’s musical sensibility, bring to mind the confected artists of Stock, Aitken & Waterman & early 1990s Europop groups such as Aqua. If you close your eyes and squint, the “Better Sit Down Boy” video has certain similarities to Aqua’s “Barbie Girl”. Annoyingly likeable, here’s the clip:

Advertisements

8 thoughts on “Top tracks of 2017 #19 – Four Tet, Fatima Yamaha, Grandaddy & Confidence Man

  1. My number 19 is by Fatima Yamaha. An avant-garde female Egyptian artist ? A Japanese Garage Rock band ? No, a Dutch bloke called Bas. This is the sublime Araya

    1. Does this qualify as synthcore, I wonder? The squelchy bass synth certainly does and contours up the wonderful music by Survive for Stranger Things, with a bit of Todd Terje thrown in.

  2. I may be wrong but this may appear in other people’s lists, but they’ll know, and we’ll find out in the coming days. I’ve no idea what they’ve been up to in the intervening time because the only album I have of theirs is “The Sophtware Slump” from 2000, which contains the wonderfully-titled 9 minute epic “He’s Simple, He’s Dumb, He’s The Pilot”, along with “The Crystal Lake”, which some of you will certainly be familar with. So, this was a single from their 2017 offering “Last Place”, which thankfully is something during my nascent running career I’ve so far managed to avoid! Number 19…

  3. Not usually my style, I fully expect I will never buy an album by electropop collective Confidence Man. But their single “Better Sit Down” boy is one of these annoying ear-worms which my subsconscious tries to block but which I end up tagging repeatedly on Shazam over a couple of months. The band, comprised of various members of Aussie indie acts like The Belligerents, Moses Gunn Collective and the Jungle Giants, are known only by their stage names such as Reggie Goodchild, Clarence McGuffie, Janet Planet and Sugar Bones. This, along with the band’s musical sensibility, bring to mind the confected artists of Stock, Aitken & Waterman & early 1990s Europop groups such as Aqua. If you close your eyes and squint, the “Better Sit Down Boy” video has certain similarities to Aqua’s “Barbie Girl”. Annoyingly likeable, here’s the clip:

    1. Having never heard of them before this entry, the very next day the breakfast DJ on BBC6 music read out an email from a listener who went to see them somewhere in the UK last night – small world.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s